NPKUA FUNDED RESEARCH

The NPKUA is pleased to highlight the 2018 Research Awards. These awards are made possible by our member organizations who raise funds each year on the local level for research. Thank you for helping make these awards possible as we work towards improving treatment options for PKU and accelerating the timeline for a cure.

The overall funding strategy of the NPKUA is to support projects that will promote advances in the treatment and management of PKU, with the long term goal of facilitating the development of a cure. The NPKUA has a Scientific Advisory Board made up of eminently qualified doctors, researchers and clinicians that evaluate the proposals and provide a recommendation to the NPKUA Board each year for funding.

Impact of Funding

The last eight years have seen great strides in finding ways to improve treatment for PKU. We are pleased to share our annually funded research awards that focus on new and innovative treatment options for PKU and accelerating the timeline for a cure.

Click here for a list of the 2017
Research Awards. 

Click here for a list of the 2016
Research Awards. 

Click here for a list of the 2015
Research Awards.

Click here for a list of the 2014
Research Awards.

Click here for a list of the 2013
Research Awards.

Click here for a list of the 2012
Research Awards.

Click here for a list of the 2011
Research Awards.

Click here for a list of the 2010
Research Awards.

2018 Research Awards

Dr. Erik Koppes at the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC is working to develop, characterize and assess new model systems for understanding and treating PKU.

Dr. Shawn Christ at the University of Missouri continues researching how PKU may effect the brain and explores the relationship between the gray matter findings and markers of treatment adherence and neuropsychological performance in individuals with PKU.

Dr. Jiping Yue at the University of Chicago Biological Sciences Division studies a novel therapeutic strategy on PKU treatment by adapting a skin system to metabolize Phe.

Dr. Eileen K. Jaffe at the Fox Chase Cancer Center continues studying how structure changes in the phenylalanine hydroxylase enzyme (PAH) ensure the control of phenylalanine (Phe) concentration.

Dr. Cary O. Harding at the Oregon Health & Science University continues to research gene therapy as a promising approach to treat and cure PKU.

Dr. Katherine Durrer at the University of North Texas Health Science Center has engineered a probiotic to lower blood Phe levels and is working with Trayer Biotherapeutics to produce a clinically safe batch of this new probiotic to use in preclinical animal studies.

Dr. Roberto Gramignoli at the Karolinska Institutet in Stolkholm, Sweden is focusing in cell-based therapies to correct metabolic defects.

Dr. Beat Thöny at the University of Zürich studies a novel dietary treatment of PKU by gastrointestinal degradation of Phe to lower Phe levels in PKU subjects by using an engineered probiotic.

Click here for full summaries of the 2018 research projects.

 


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